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> temperature and ph
post Apr 2 2006, 11:01 PM
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magic

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Is there any relationship between water temperature and pH?


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post Apr 2 2006, 11:03 PM
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HornPlayer54

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In what sense....? Do you mean as temp fluctuates will ph fluctuate or vice versa? Or are you looking for something else?


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post Apr 2 2006, 11:31 PM
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Heather

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Hi Magic! The temperature of the water does not affect the PH value if that's what you're asking.

Is there a problem? Could you elaborate please? icon_mrgreen.gif


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post Apr 2 2006, 11:56 PM
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dave628

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unless you are talking about buffer...then some buffer's ph will change according to temperature..but those buffer are not used in fish aquariums...otherwise temp should not affect ph...


This post has been edited by dave628: Apr 2 2006, 11:57 PM


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post Apr 3 2006, 10:08 AM
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Les

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The warm water temp can actually impact PH a bit. Suppose you are buffering with salts. As water evaporates, the salts are left behind which can increase the ph slightly.


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post Apr 3 2006, 11:43 AM
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magic

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Thks everyone for the infos.

My concern is as the water temperature increases, the amount of dissolved oxygen will decreases.
Will it affect the PH value?


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post Apr 3 2006, 11:50 AM
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Heather

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QUOTE(magic @ Apr 3 2006, 11:43 AM) *
My concern is as the water temperature increases, the amount of dissolved oxygen will decreases.

That is absolutely true... but directly anyway (I don't use buffers....) temp does not affect PH.
What cichlids are you keeping and what temp are they at?
I don't keep any of my tanks above 78.. one of the reasons being what you just stated thumbsup.gif
(My Cyphos are kept even cooler!)


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post Apr 4 2006, 12:45 PM
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magic

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QUOTE(HeatherInNH @ Apr 1 2006, 11:50 PM) *
What cichlids are you keeping and what temp are they at?


I'm keeping Tropheus, Aulonocara stuartgranti "German Red", Ophthalmotilapia Ventralis,etc. and the temp is between 79 to 83 .


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post Apr 4 2006, 06:07 PM
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Trainer

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It is true that as water temperature increases, the water cannot hold as much oxygen. It doesn't automatically mean that the DO levels drop though - it only means that water cannot physically hold as much dissolved oxygen at a higher temperature as it can at a lower temperature. DO levels only drop due to an increase in temperature when your existing DO is greater than the maximum DO of the new water temperature.

It's not really the change in oxygen levels that cause the pH shifts. Changes in pH are usually caused by the nitrification process or the conversion of dissolved CO2 into carbonic acid. Water can only hold a finite amount of dissolved gases, so as CO2 concentration increases, O2 may decrease (if water is at it's saturation point - if it's not, dissolved gases may still accumulate up to this point). So when the CO2 level increases, the pH drops and the O2 levels drop as it is displaced by CO2. A lot of people take this to mean that as O2 levels drop, the pH goes down or vice versa. In reality, the changing O2 levels are the result of the CO2 levels changing. The changing pH is also a result of the CO2 levels changing.

Clear as mud, eh?


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post Apr 4 2006, 10:38 PM
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HornPlayer54

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Great post Trainer! Makes a lot of sense.


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