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> Please Explain Tropheus To Me!
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post Jan 1 2006, 06:43 PM
Post #1
Heather

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Joined: 18-December 05
From: New Hampshire
Posts: 5,168



Klaus,
I don't know how to phrase this....

What's the deal with tropheus?

I have been keeping cichlids for over 20 years... all kinds... I've never kept tropheus.

Tropheus to me are pretty, but not known as an easy fish to care for. Reading the threads around here regarding their diet is interesting, seems like it might not be that bad.

I also get the impression they really need large species only tanks for best care.

I could be way off... please enlighten me icon_mrgreen.gif

Maybe if you could tell us how many variants there are approx? How are their numbers in the lake? Are they being line-bred like peacocks to form new variations?

thanks klaus! thumbsup.gif


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post Jan 1 2006, 07:14 PM
Post #2
mongo

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From: north central texas
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Yeah "Bunt" give us the straight dope on these guys please. I also have never kept them...and would be interested except that i have also heard that they are "prima donnas" compared to the majority of African Cichlids. Thanx in advance for your knowledge and time.


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MONGO


Negotiation is the art of saying"Nice Doggy"while looking for a big rock.


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post Jan 1 2006, 07:55 PM
Post #3
Grasshopper

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Joined: 30-December 05
From: Nicholasville,Ky.
Posts: 102



Well....it is an addiction. You start with one colony...and BAMBAMBAM.....you GOTTA have more...lol. I got my first colony about 10 years ago. Since then I have had many different colonies, my favorites being the brichardi's I sold a few months ago. Each variant that I have kept have had their own personalties different than all the others. I haven't really figured out the exact reason I am addicted to these guys but I sit and watch my troph's every single day when I get home from work. So much activity within the colonies I guess is the main reason they are so addictive. Also there is just so many "flavors" to choose from. LMAO...next week I am getting 3 more tanks just so I can talk my wife into getting me 3 more tropheus colonies. I just have to say that if you want a group of fish that are always on the go....get tropheus. But be prepared to make room for more tanks, because the addiction will hit you soon thereafter.
Billy


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post Jan 1 2006, 08:16 PM
Post #4
cowchick75

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From: Brantford, ON, CA
Posts: 3,041



Good point Grasshopper! In August '05 I had an angel colony...then my pleco killed them all so I started into cichlids in September! And voila...I went from 1 90 gallon to 8 tanks as of today! Cichlids are just so addicting, and I find we each find that special fish that turns our crank! I have to admit...I saw those tropheus at MarkW's and wish I could have my own groups!

Klaus, I'll be looking forward to all your information, as well as everyone else's and it will always be filed in a folder in my brain for future use!

Steph


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post Jan 1 2006, 09:27 PM
Post #5
Buntbarsch

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So, you would like to know about Tropheus and would like to keep them too eh. Well let me tell you something right up front, find some person close to you and ask them to keep an eye on you. Ask them to watch for the following signs:

1. Your "Tropheus" t-shirt is always dry-cleaned; 2. Your banking card password is "Tropheus"; 3. You think ALL "Tropheus " are beautiful, even the ugly ones; 4. You tell everybody that "Tropheus" are the easiest cichlid to keep and that you NEVER lost one.

If you have any of these symptoms, you are seriously ill and have caught the "TROPHEUS SYNDROME".

Now that's enough joking, let's get to it then:

Tropheus were discovered by Mr. Moore in 1896 and first described by George Boulenger 2 years later. Pierre Brichard introduced the first Tropheus into the aquarium trade in 1958 and the first exported Tropheus was the "Rutunga" or "Brabant Moorii". [attachment=309:attachment] Today, and I mean TODAY, there are 6 different Tropheus species: T. Duboisi; T. Brichardi; T. Moorii; Annectens; T. Polli and T. Kasabae but there are over 120 different color variants. Now the experts are still arguing about the amount of species and I am sure that that will change in the near future. Here is the latest location map for the color variants [attachment=310:attachment]

If you never kept tropheus, do yourself a favor and stop listening to all the horror story's that are out there. Now I know that I have the Tropheus Syndrome but you can believe me when I tell you that TROPHEUS ARE NOT DIFFICULT TO KEEP. If anybody else tells you other vise, PLEASE sent him to me. Now we all know that keeping any kind of animal is a responsibility and we have to look after them. It does not matter what type of cichlid you keep, you take care of it. There is no difference with Tropheus. The most important thing is to establish a routine. Feed them at the same time. Once a day, twice a day or 5 times a day does not matter if you do it at the same time. The same is with water changes. You have to do them once per week about 30-40 percent. I personally do them every Saturday morning. I will explain the reason for the routine later.

If you start with an adult group, get at least 1 of them and use a tank of at least 65 gal (4 feet long). Better is a 100 gal. My suggestion would be to get about 20 first generation fry and let them grow up together. The best species would be T. Duboisi because they are not as aggressive as the others and are probably the easiest available. Fry [attachment=311:attachment] Adult [attachment=312:attachment]

The other thing is the food. Now I have no interest to open another can of worms here but it is an important issue. You feed whatever works for you, I just tell you what I have learned. I feed exclusively spirulina to ALL my Tropheus and Petrochromis and have no food related issues whatsoever. My fish are healthy, show a beautiful color and breed like rabbits. Keeping Tropheus since the early 1970's, I have killed my share and learned my lessons trying different types of food and different methods to keep them happy. They are happy now.

OK, that's enough for now. As Arnold would say now "I'll be back". [attachment=313:attachment]


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post Jan 1 2006, 10:50 PM
Post #6
markw

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From: Ottawa Ontario
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I think another really distinct attraction to Tropheus that is very unique is that they are endemic to such very localized areas in the Lake. Like Klaus mentioned and showed in Peter Schupke's map of the Lake, some of the variants come only from small bays and do not migrate at all. Four of the Eight species do vary geographically and therefore create problems for those mixing species together in captivity, as they may interbreed and create unwanted hybrids.Their names usually reflect the Bay or area that they originated from and their colours change with their locals. The other attraction I find appealing is that there are always new variants being discovered in the Lake. There are probably many more untapped areas along the Zaire(former Republic of Congo) coastline that are too dangerous to explore until stablity returns to there.
There are just so many different types and species with varying colours. The characteristics and personalities change with every colony, and you just can't get bored with them. As Klaus mentions, you start making excuses about why you keep them, but it all goes along with the addiction.
I don't think there's a simple answer to whats so appealing about them, but hopefully you can start to see some reasons for the insanity!
Markw


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post Jan 2 2006, 10:19 AM
Post #7
fishboy

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From: Wichita,KS
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Klaus, can tropheus be kept in a 75 or 90g tank. I am seriously thinking of doing a colony someday with some petricola, i am thinking of around 12-18 fish. Here is what i would want in the species
1)Color, i would want something that has a red or yellow stripe
2)Interaction, i know they are all a fish that loves to interact, but i know that some interact more than others.

I am going to go to cichlid-forum and research some to see what i like

Klaus, i wouldm probably get bemba or cherry spot from bluechip aquatics or whatever the one is in ohio. I would get 20 of them and thin the colony down to however many males you think i need


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180- 32 WC tropheus malagarasi 75g-mbuna, soon to be eureka red colony
55g- cycling, to house 2m/8f ngara flametails
20g long- 54 malagarasi fry(180g has about 15 more in it)
20g long- 27 .5 inch ngara fry
20g long- saulosi and afra cobue fry(has my new breeder cobue in it)
10g- labeo. trew. mphanga fry


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post Jan 2 2006, 10:33 AM
Post #8
Buntbarsch

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QUOTE(fishboy @ Jan 2 2006, 09:11 AM) *
Klaus, can tropheus be kept in a 75 or 90g tank. I am seriously thinking of doing a colony someday with some petricola, i am thinking of around 12-18 fish. Here is what i would want in the species
1)Color, i would want something that has a red or yellow stripe
2)Interaction, i know they are all a fish that loves to interact, but i know that some interact more than others.

I am going to go to cichlid-forum and research some to see what i like


Hi Fishboy,

Yes, you can keep Tropheus in a 75 gal. The 90 gal would be better. You can easily keep 20 Tropheus in there which would be a nice group. Use large rocks for decorations. You mention that you would like some with a red or yellow stripe; well, research the species before you buy it. One of the prettiest Tropheus is the "Ikola" or "Kaiser", but it is also one of the more demanding and aggressive ones. The "Kiriza" or "Kaiser ll" also has a yellow stripe but is much easier on his mates and in my opinion looks even better because the yellow stripe also goes through the fins were the stripe at the "Ikolas" only covers the body.


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post Jan 2 2006, 11:03 AM
Post #9
fishboy

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From: Wichita,KS
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I really like the cherry spots and the illanga or whatever. What ratio would you keep. Also, do you ship, do you think i could get fry cheaper from you than a online retailer.


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180- 32 WC tropheus malagarasi 75g-mbuna, soon to be eureka red colony
55g- cycling, to house 2m/8f ngara flametails
20g long- 54 malagarasi fry(180g has about 15 more in it)
20g long- 27 .5 inch ngara fry
20g long- saulosi and afra cobue fry(has my new breeder cobue in it)
10g- labeo. trew. mphanga fry


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post Jan 2 2006, 11:22 AM
Post #10
Buntbarsch

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QUOTE(fishboy @ Jan 2 2006, 10:03 AM) *
I really like the cherry spots and the illanga or whatever. What ratio would you keep. Also, do you ship, do you think i could get fry cheaper from you than a online retailer.


Yes, the cherry spots are very nice and there should be no problem to get some. The illangi however are a different story. They are not being imported anymore due to over collecting and the prices for fry have just gone through the roof. I have seen 1" fry being offered in Michigan for $30.00 each.

I always like to see what I buy, so I have never used an on-line dealer to buy cichlids and are not familiar with their prices. Any fry I like to sell is posted on my website and no, I don't ship.


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